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Xss Attack

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Grammarly is the unicorn company that announced its open bug bounty program last September. Since that time, many security researchers posted their submissions and got paid well. Some of Grammarly’s issues are also useful for others. Like the recent XSS, that also bypasses an AWS WAF. The recent XSS report is a bit different among others. First of all, it was submitted by Frans Rosen, one of the top HackerOne hackers. He is the 6th…

What do you do if you need to protect your website from XSS attacks? Most people patch it and get a WAF. This is common knowledge and there are plenty of places where you could go to get basic protection for your websites. From a free solution to solutions costing hundreds of thousands of dollars, most of them will claim they protect from OWASP Top 10 threats. So is there a real difference between WAFs?…

In a recent article published by Security Boulevard, we talked about OWASP Top 10 Risk classification and overlap. In this post, we will examine tools that allegedly help address these risks. You may be at more risk than you’ve been lead to believe. The following is an OWASP Risk Overlap diagram (based on the Security Boulevard article) will be used to illustrate different threat intelligence and detection mechanisms. The following color-coded visual aids help understand…

How to trick CSP in letting you run whatever you want By bo0om, Wallarm research Content Security Policy or CSP is a built-in browser technology which helps protect from attacks such as cross-site scripting (XSS). It lists and describes paths and sources, from which the browser can safely load resources. The resources may include images, frames, javascript and more. But what if we can give an example of successful XSS attacks when no unsafe resource origins…

The Journey to the New and Improved Ten Most Critical Web Application Security Risks It was not too long ago that protecting your web server infrastructure consisted of simply placing the server(s) in their own zone behind the firewall and just opening a couple of ports. Outside of endpoint protection, that was pretty much the formula. That, however, was in a static HTML world. Today, thanks to the fruition of the web application and how it…

by bo0om, Wallarm Research I’ve previously published an article about using Safari to compromise a computer file system. Unfortunately, there are more issues with Safari as we are now finding out. In this post, we will take a look at the possibility of a XSS exploit and a cookie compromise stemming from “unusual” Safari behavior. Normal browsers and their DNS requests. What does a browser do to open a web page? First, it sends a…